Our Shepherds

 
Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown

Jim Childress

Jim Childress

Ralph Denney

Ralph Denney

Rob Griffin

Rob Griffin

Brent Starkey

Brent Starkey

“Now the overseer is to be above reproach, faithful to his wife, temperate, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not given to drunkenness, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. He must manage his own family well and see that his children obey him, and he must do so in a manner worthy of full respect.  (If anyone does not know how to manage his own family, how can he take care of God’s church?) He must not be a recent convert, or he may become conceited and fall under the same judgment as the devil. He must also have a good reputation with outsiders, so that he will not fall into disgrace and into the devil’s trap.” –1 Timothy 3.2-7

What do Shepherds Do?

 
The New Testament writers often referred to “shepherds” as bishops, overseers or elders when referring to local churches who must give an account for the sheep under their care (Hebrews 13.17). A list of their qualities can be found in 1 Timothy 3.1-7, 1 Peter 5.1-4 and Titus 1.5-9. The word Shepherd means Pastor. Shepherds primarily concern themselves with the spiritual, emotional, and physical health of the Christian flock under their care. Working together with the minister, church staff, and deacons, these men and their spouses seek to nurture the growth and well-being of the Christians in their local church.
Their primary concern is for PEOPLE, not programs or budgets that’s why the New Testament refers to elders as “shepherds.” Elders serve as mentors, teachers, and enablers to help each Christian under their care grow up into the fullness of Christ (Ephesians 4:11-13).